...and have you heard voices?

Jul 29

cross-connect:

Randall Rosenthal born 1947 in NY has become famous creating what appears to be a cardboard box stuffed to the brim with wads of cash. In reality, both the box and the cash are carved out of wood and hand painted to jaw-dropping, lifelike precision by the artist. Though Rosenthal’s portfolio of work also includes wood recreated as newspapers, baseball cards, binders, books and more, it is his sculptures of money that have particularly captured the public’s eye.

"Half the time is spent on carving and half is spent on painting, they’re the exact opposite processes. I start with a block of wood and it’s totally reductive in that I take away wood until I get what I want.

The carving is a high-wire act because there’s no room for error and I don’t plan it out, the painting is the opposite. You can paint on the paint forever, until you get what you like.” (by )

Jul 27
vvaterblogged:

Keith Haring. Pop Shop II (3)

vvaterblogged:

Keith Haring. Pop Shop II (3)

Jul 23

slowartday:

Roger Hiorns, Seizure, 2008

Rather than present a sculpture inside an architectural space, he’s turned every surface of the architectural space into sculpture. Mixing installation art and chemistry, he’s taken an entire abandoned apartment near London’s Elephant & Castle and transformed it into a gemstone. Covering the inside with blue copper sulphate crystals, he’s created an other-worldly, mineralized, glinting mirror of an everyday apartment. Jewels literally glowing from the ceiling and lining the floors… (via)

Jul 18
fleurdulys:

Blue Seascape, Wave Effect - Georges Lacombe
1893

fleurdulys:

Blue Seascape, Wave Effect - Georges Lacombe

1893

Jul 11

jedavu:

SCULPTURES BY EDOARDO TRESOLDI

Jul 03

pleoros:

Stunning Aerial Photography by George Steinmetz

Jul 03

cross-connect:

The Exquisite ’ Inner Space ’ Architecture of Matthew Simmonds

” Simmonds makes a play of architecture and ornamentation on a small scale, but the spaces created give the same feeling as in the buildings themselves; a place to rest, a place to travel with the eye and maybe find a moment of tranquillity. The marble is opened up, and inside is a space within a building that only exists in the viewer’s mind. What you sense is the significance of space.” ( Artodyssey )

From his early childhood, Simmonds was fascinated by stone buildings, an affection that flows into his artworks, where stone architecture is used as a central theme. Particularly the medieval architecture, with its striving to get to a new sophistication of space, comes alive in the marble. Simmonds makes a play of architecture and ornamentation on a small scale, but the spaces created give the same feeling as in the buildings themselves; a place to rest, a place to travel with the eye and maybe find a moment of tranquillity. The marble is opened up, and inside is a space within a building that only exists in the viewer’s mind. What you sense is the significance of space.

Selected and Posted to Cross-Connect by Andrew

Mar 28
plasmatics-life:

Ocean Waves ~ By Clark Little
Mar 28
weandthecolor:

Entropy – Melilla Art School
More about the Entropy wall artwork on WE AND THE COLOR
Follow WATC on:FacebookTwitterGoogle+PinterestFlipboardInstagram

weandthecolor:

Entropy – Melilla Art School

More about the Entropy wall artwork on WE AND THE COLOR

Follow WATC on:
Facebook
Twitter
Google+
Pinterest
Flipboard
Instagram

Mar 28

submariet:

VAN EYCK

Mar 21
ponderation:

Boracay’s magical sunset by Andres Peter June Gutierrez

ponderation:

Boracay’s magical sunset by Andres Peter June Gutierrez

Mar 14

unknowneditors:

Paper artist: Diana Beltran Herrera

The Cornell Fine Arts Museum will display seven sculptures by Diana Beltran Herrera. The works are completely made of paper and feature local bird species. The project is a CFAM collaboration with the Latin American Student Association, the Department of Biology, and the Department of Environmental Studies at Rollins College.

Herrera’s work seeks to explore the chillingly disengaged relationship between humans and nature in modern society. Using paper as her primary medium she is able to present notions of temporality and change, emphasizing the process of transformation that continuously occurs in nature as well as humankind.

We’re Unknown Editors. Check us out on facebook, instagram & twitter.

Feb 24
Feb 12

laughterkey:

cemeterycigarettes:

Anton Konashuk Photography

THIS IS MY NEW FAVORITE THING ON TUMBLR GOODNESS

A+

Feb 12
talkingbreakfast:

So yesterday I went to Shia LaBeouf’s #IAmSorry.
It’s right across the street from the BuzzFeed office in LA, and there were only a few people in line (this is before the word spread), so I figured why not.
This picture was taken while I was waiting to go in. Ha ha, I’m hilarious. At the time, I figured it’d be… I dunno. Just something. A mild amusement or momentary diversion. Something to see and shrug about and then get back to work.
I left feeling oddly emotional and affected by the whole thing.
After being patted down by a security guard, you enter (only one person at a time) and can choose from several items on a table. They didn’t say why. We’re supposed to make our own interpretations, I guess. To me, they were symbols of ways you can feel about Shia LaBeouf or something. A whip for punishment (or Indiana Jones), Hershey’s Kisses for forgiveness or love, stuff like that.
I was drawn toward a bowl of what looked like fortune cookie fortunes, and read a few. They were angry tweets, directed at Shia LaBeouf.
And that just kind of hit me, in a bad way. Like, I wouldn’t want to have all that hate directed at me. It’d make me want to die. And I wouldn’t want to direct all that hate at somebody. And there are probably hundreds of thousands of these tweets — this bowl is just the tip of the iceberg.
I actually didn’t want to carry that item, so I picked the copy of Daniel Clowes’s The Death-Ray (since I’m familiar with that book) and entered the next room, where Shia LaBeouf was waiting.
And here’s what hit me — and it seems obvious, but it’s way too easy to forget: he’s a person. Yes, with a paper bag over his head and doing some weird art stunt, but he’s still a human being, with thoughts and feelings and everything imperfect that goes along with being a person.
I noticed the tattoos on his hands and realized this is just some guy who’s dealing with a lot of ridiculous and stupid and difficult stuff (like we all are), a lot of which is his own fault, and I started talking to him.
Not about much, and I can’t remember the specifics, only that it’s a shame how human beings sometimes treat each other, and that we forget how we’re all mostly the same. I think that’s when the trouble starts — when we forget that. And it’s even easier to forget when we’re hiding behind a computer screen. Life is rough, and we sometimes make it rougher for ourselves, and in the end I just said, “Keep on keepin’ on,” and left.
I never would’ve expected to feel empathy toward someone whose name I can’t even pronounce, but there I was, choked up over the shittiness of the world. All thanks to some guy wearing a paper bag on his head.
Afterward I talked to some coworkers about the experience and it was amazing how everyone had a different reaction — from annoyance to confusion to bemusement to wanting to ignore it in the hopes that maybe he’ll shut up, and all of those reactions are correct.
Art’s what we bring to the table, after all (and here I wish I could post that Ad Reinhardt cartoon of an abstract painting saying “What do YOU represent?”), and for some reason I brought a lot of empathy. I was surprised. Maybe I’m more of a Buddhist than I thought I was.
I talked about it with my friend/coworker Ari later, and he filled me in on the whole Clowes/plagiarism debacle (I only knew a tiny bit of the story). He didn’t see the exhibit (or whatever you want to call it), but his reaction was much more critical.
He felt I was being manipulated, which is true. To quote Homer Simpson, “I AM the highly suggestible type.” And I think that’s true of art in general — it’s trying to manipulate people. Maybe in some specific way, or maybe to just get a reaction or experience.
Some people have to express themselves. Some people have to try and get a reaction. Sometimes these overlap traits overlap, especially with artists or people too used to performing or trapped in the Hollywood game or in the young and foolish
I’ll probably never know Shia LaBeouf’s intention for his whole #IAmSorry thing, whether he’s trying to make an artistic statement or if he’s having some kind of mental/emotional breakdown or if he’s truly sorry or if he’s a sociopath asshole monster (who is still a person) or if he’s doing an elaborate promotional stunt for another Transformers movie or if he just wants to get attention or reactions from people. It could be any of these, or all of these, or none.
I won’t know. But I do know what I got out of the experience.

talkingbreakfast:

So yesterday I went to Shia LaBeouf’s #IAmSorry.

It’s right across the street from the BuzzFeed office in LA, and there were only a few people in line (this is before the word spread), so I figured why not.

This picture was taken while I was waiting to go in. Ha ha, I’m hilarious. At the time, I figured it’d be… I dunno. Just something. A mild amusement or momentary diversion. Something to see and shrug about and then get back to work.

I left feeling oddly emotional and affected by the whole thing.

After being patted down by a security guard, you enter (only one person at a time) and can choose from several items on a table. They didn’t say why. We’re supposed to make our own interpretations, I guess. To me, they were symbols of ways you can feel about Shia LaBeouf or something. A whip for punishment (or Indiana Jones), Hershey’s Kisses for forgiveness or love, stuff like that.

I was drawn toward a bowl of what looked like fortune cookie fortunes, and read a few. They were angry tweets, directed at Shia LaBeouf.

And that just kind of hit me, in a bad way. Like, I wouldn’t want to have all that hate directed at me. It’d make me want to die. And I wouldn’t want to direct all that hate at somebody. And there are probably hundreds of thousands of these tweets — this bowl is just the tip of the iceberg.

I actually didn’t want to carry that item, so I picked the copy of Daniel Clowes’s The Death-Ray (since I’m familiar with that book) and entered the next room, where Shia LaBeouf was waiting.

And here’s what hit me — and it seems obvious, but it’s way too easy to forget: he’s a person. Yes, with a paper bag over his head and doing some weird art stunt, but he’s still a human being, with thoughts and feelings and everything imperfect that goes along with being a person.

I noticed the tattoos on his hands and realized this is just some guy who’s dealing with a lot of ridiculous and stupid and difficult stuff (like we all are), a lot of which is his own fault, and I started talking to him.

Not about much, and I can’t remember the specifics, only that it’s a shame how human beings sometimes treat each other, and that we forget how we’re all mostly the same. I think that’s when the trouble starts — when we forget that. And it’s even easier to forget when we’re hiding behind a computer screen. Life is rough, and we sometimes make it rougher for ourselves, and in the end I just said, “Keep on keepin’ on,” and left.

I never would’ve expected to feel empathy toward someone whose name I can’t even pronounce, but there I was, choked up over the shittiness of the world. All thanks to some guy wearing a paper bag on his head.

Afterward I talked to some coworkers about the experience and it was amazing how everyone had a different reaction — from annoyance to confusion to bemusement to wanting to ignore it in the hopes that maybe he’ll shut up, and all of those reactions are correct.

Art’s what we bring to the table, after all (and here I wish I could post that Ad Reinhardt cartoon of an abstract painting saying “What do YOU represent?”), and for some reason I brought a lot of empathy. I was surprised. Maybe I’m more of a Buddhist than I thought I was.

I talked about it with my friend/coworker Ari later, and he filled me in on the whole Clowes/plagiarism debacle (I only knew a tiny bit of the story). He didn’t see the exhibit (or whatever you want to call it), but his reaction was much more critical.

He felt I was being manipulated, which is true. To quote Homer Simpson, “I AM the highly suggestible type.” And I think that’s true of art in general — it’s trying to manipulate people. Maybe in some specific way, or maybe to just get a reaction or experience.

Some people have to express themselves. Some people have to try and get a reaction. Sometimes these overlap traits overlap, especially with artists or people too used to performing or trapped in the Hollywood game or in the young and foolish

I’ll probably never know Shia LaBeouf’s intention for his whole #IAmSorry thing, whether he’s trying to make an artistic statement or if he’s having some kind of mental/emotional breakdown or if he’s truly sorry or if he’s a sociopath asshole monster (who is still a person) or if he’s doing an elaborate promotional stunt for another Transformers movie or if he just wants to get attention or reactions from people. It could be any of these, or all of these, or none.

I won’t know. But I do know what I got out of the experience.